curiositycounts:

Numbers and figures from Nielsen’s 2011 Social Media report, which demonstrates the social web dominates Americans’ lives.

curiositycounts:

Numbers and figures from Nielsen’s 2011 Social Media report, which demonstrates the social web dominates Americans’ lives.

(via thenextweb)



The Lifespan of a Link - NYTimes.com
Pop quiz. How long do you think a fresh new link lasts online before people stop clicking on it? The answer: on average, just shy of 3 hours. If you ask the same question about a news-related link, the answer is a measly 5 minutes. 

The Lifespan of a Link - NYTimes.com

Pop quiz. How long do you think a fresh new link lasts online before people stop clicking on it? The answer: on average, just shy of 3 hours. If you ask the same question about a news-related link, the answer is a measly 5 minutes

(via roomthily)

Payments. While I still think GOOG will be able to easily handle payments from “slick-train” vs “Travis Stein” (especially because they still know who you REALLY are) it creates a much different experience for the users/companies handling the purchases at the endpoints. There is a bit of a mental leap trusting Money + Anonymous versus Money + Real Name.

infoneer-pulse:

Ever since Google launched its new Google+ social network, we and others have pointed out that the search giant clearly has more in mind than just providing a nice place for people to share photos of their pets. For one thing, Google needs to tap into the “social signals” that people provide through networks like Facebook so it can improve its search results. But there’s a larger motive as well: as chairman and former CEO Eric Schmidt admitted in an interview in Edinburgh over the weekend, Google is taking a hard line on the real-name issue because it sees Google+ as an “identity service” or platform on which it can build other products.

» via GigaOM

(via journo-geekery)

loganabbott:

Why is Google+ designed the way it is?

Back when he worked at Google, Facebook product manger Paul Adams did a bunch of research that he says “formed a cornerstone of the Google social strategy.”

That research culminated in a presentation called “The Real Life Social Network.”

Its basic premise was that while “the social web is not going away,” Facebook and other social networks  “donʼt match the social networks we already have offline.”

Sounds a lot like Google’s Google+ pitch, doesn’t it?

Lucky for all of us, Adams says we can reproduce the presentation here, for you.

thenextweb:

In the simplest of terms, from last Wednesday, all links (longer than 20 characters) posted on Twitter.com or any Twitter client have been wrapped with a t.co URL. This means all analytics tools are picking up ‘t.co’ as the referrer as opposed to a particular twitter client (Twitterrific, Tweetdeck etc.) or just twitter.com. Twitter’s public explanation for wrapping all links in a t.co URL is to protect users from malicious sites and scams. The side effect, and Twitter definitely knows this, is that analytics tools will now categorise all traffic from both Twitter.com and all Twitter clients as traffic coming from Twitter. Whereas before it would be divided amongst all the various twitter clients (usually just as “direct traffic”) and specific pages on Twitter.com – never directly from the tweet. If you haven’t already, I suggest you check which domain has sent you the most traffic since Wednesday – compare Twitter’s T.co vs. Facebook.com vs. StumbleUpon for example – I think many of you will now find Twitter ranks number ONE. (via Twitter Just Got the Respect it Deserves)

thenextweb:

In the simplest of terms, from last Wednesday, all links (longer than 20 characters) posted on Twitter.com or any Twitter client have been wrapped with a t.co URL. This means all analytics tools are picking up ‘t.co’ as the referrer as opposed to a particular twitter client (Twitterrific, Tweetdeck etc.) or just twitter.com. Twitter’s public explanation for wrapping all links in a t.co URL is to protect users from malicious sites and scams. The side effect, and Twitter definitely knows this, is that analytics tools will now categorise all traffic from both Twitter.com and all Twitter clients as traffic coming from Twitter. Whereas before it would be divided amongst all the various twitter clients (usually just as “direct traffic”) and specific pages on Twitter.com – never directly from the tweet. If you haven’t already, I suggest you check which domain has sent you the most traffic since Wednesday – compare Twitter’s T.co vs. Facebook.com vs. StumbleUpon for example – I think many of you will now find Twitter ranks number ONE. (via Twitter Just Got the Respect it Deserves)

(via matmiltd)